Two partial knee replacements

fit and active

​Sanjeev has done amazingly well following his second (left) partial knee replacement. At the time of writing he is three weeks down the line and has been off all pain killers for 10 days as well as off crutches.

Right partial knee replacement - 2016

He is a 59 year old gentleman who first came to see me back in December 2016 with a very painful right knee. Although usually fit and active, he was beginning to slow down and was experiencing medial knee pain on both sides, the right initially slightly worse than the left. I did X-rays and MRI scans and found that the patellofemoral and lateral compartments were in good shape, and really his disease was all confined to the medial compartments.

He underwent a right partial knee replacement and ultimately did well, although he was a bit slow with rehabilitation. He got a bit stiff and had some  post operative swelling, necessitating blood thinners to reduce his risk of blood clots. I ended up doing an MUA (manipulation under anaesthesia) and steroid injection. He had very little pain and was out of hospital after a day or two, off his crutches after 2-3 weeks and off all pain killers by about the same time. So he was soon back on track and did well enough to come back to have the left knee done.

Left partial knee replacement - 2017

Now he has just had the left done, and has done so well that he's more than happy to talk about his experiences.

partial knee replacement

AP view of left partial knee replacement

partial knee replacement

Lateral view of left partial knee replacement

He had no swelling after the left side and behaved much more as I would have hoped he would! I went for a partial knee replacement again rather than an osteotomy as he was neutrally aligned. In other words he had a straight leg already and therefore wasn't suitable for an osteotomy. If he had had any bow-leggedness (ie varus) I would have offered him an osteotomy.

He was able to leave hospital within two days and was virtually pain free when I saw him just three weeks down the line from his left partial knee replacement. He has not taken any painkillers for 10 days, and has nearly a full bend and is off his crutches.

It is a real testament to this procedure of partial knee replacement that patients can do so well. He is literally just about to start his retirement and feels this is now going to give him the ability to be active and do the things he wants to do - which currently he couldn't because he was really quite restricted in terms of how much he could walk and the swelling that he was getting. We really do feel that medial partial knee replacement and lateral partial knee replacement are two of the best operations that we can offer our patients, and this is a very good example of how well patients can do. 

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Adrian Wilson


Sanjeev's testimonial:
"Over the past 1 years I have had uni-compartment replacement to both my knees. I was referred to Adrian exactly 1 year ago. Most recently i.e. Mid Oct I had my left knee uni-compartment replacement which I will refer to in this testimonial.

"After having had my right knee done in March’17 I was still limping but was not keen to have surgery so soon. However in August of this year I found it difficult to climb up the stairs and felt that I needed to see Adrian again just to determine the issues with my left knee. Historically I have played a lot of squash and tennis and in 2010 had arthroscopy on my left knee due to meniscus tear etc. After the MRI Xray Adrian indicated I had grade 4 OA in my medial compartment.

"We considered options including corticosteroid injections and braces but to me this were all short term fixes. I am due to retire at the end of 2017 and didn’t want my retirement to be limited by my mobility. So I went ahead with the left knee having had a good response and outcome to my right knee.The op went as normal though it was a bit longer than normal and the scar reflected that as well. However the first thing I noticed the day after was my flex was much better than I had had with my right knee , so much so that I asked Adrian if they had done something different, but he reassured me to say it was the same procedure.

"My mobility improved well and even during my inpatient stay of 2 days I was able to move around reasonably well, use the toilet and shower facilities. I was discharged as I had near enough 90 degree flex in sharp contrast to my right knee a few months ago when left after 3 days with a 60 degree flex.On this occasion I was discharged on paracetamol and codeine but I insisted on this being changed to oral morph. I initially though that the post op pain medication was inadequate but felt I would give it the weekend to assess. I had the oral morph a few nights immediately post discharge . Continued with the judicious use of ice through a cryo cuff. Again as I noticed post operatively my movement was a lot better. My knee flex was improving all the time as the inflammation reduced and the exercises didn’t seem so strenuous.I didn’t feel much pain just some tightness at the knee – due to the inflammation. So much so that I stopped all pain medication a week of being discharged- didn’t seem to need it. Within a few days of being discharged I was walking in house without crutches and outdoors would use 1 which was also "ditched “ within 3 weeks.

"Now 2 months after the op I have some residual swelling and that is to be expected but am moving well having just been discharged by Adrian. I have taken no pain medication since I stopped and am very very pleased with the outcome.I appreciate this is major surgery and people may want to put it off until late but from my experience and I am 59 years old I wanted to lead as normal a life as possible and this was the best solution especially being in he hands of Prof Wilson. The key thing that attracted me to him and to have both my knees done was his philosophy and attitude of trying to preserve the knee as much as possible . Not everyone would have recommended a partial knee op . Can’t recommend him highly enough."

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